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  • Iowa Office

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Cell Towers and Fiber Optics

Once a map and site plan are received, research is conducted on previously recorded historic properties that may intersect and are within a one-mile radius of the project area. Then we conduct a Phase I archaeological investigation for the proposed cell tower location and follow up with a comprehensive report detailing any potential impact, to any historic properties within the project area. In certain cases, such as a highly disturbed context, we can conduct an office review of the project without the need for a field visit. We also provide monitoring services in the field during construction.

Below are a few sites we have worked on.

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Coe College, Murray Hall. A Phase 1 archaeological survey was conducted for ground equipment associated with new telecommunications tower to be installed on the roof of the building. An architectural review was conducted for two historic districts within a one-half mile radius of the tower.
Iowa City, Iowa, Slater Residence Hall on the University of Iowa campus. A Phase 1 archaeological survey was conducted for ground equipment associated with new telecommunications tower to be installed on the roof of the building. An architectural review was conducted for three historic districts within a one-half mile radius of the tower.
Rib Lake, Wisconsin. Phase 1 archaeological survey for an existing telecommunications tower.
Des Moines, Iowa, Douglas Avenue Fire Station with a proposed cell tower to be place within the yard adjacent the building. The project area was in a disturbed context.
Iowa County, Wisconsin. A proposed cell tower in an agricultural field was subjected to a Phase 1 archaeological survey.
Dodge County, Wisconsin. Phase 2 evaluation for a proposed cell tower location that intersected an archaeological site. Several 1 x 2-meter test units were placed upon the site. The site was deemed ineligible for the NRHP, construction of the tower proceeded without delay.
Kendall County, Illinois, a proposed cell tower located in an urban setting was subjected to a Phase 1 archaeological survey.
An access road for a proposed cell tower located on a hilltop in Keweenaw County, Michigan. Much of the Keweenaw Peninsula has been subjected to mining for copper ore.
Air photo of a proposed cell tower north of Iowa City, Iowa near the Coralville Reservoir. This proposed cell tower was to be located on a ridge. An adjacent ridge contained a group of 22 Native American burial mounds. T he mound group was originally discovered in 1910. Through extensive fieldwork Mr. Dickson successfully relocated the mound group back in 1981, so MAC was keenly aware of the high probability of significant archaeological sites to exist in the area. The tower was moved downslope from the ridgetop.
The above photograph displays a project area where the men are standing, that has been drastically landscaped and subsequently disturbed. Photographic evidence shows a large asphalt parking lot within an urban setting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The leveling and digging produced substantial subsoil disturbance. Buried utilities consisting of water, sewer, gas and electric are present for the business associated with the parking lot as well as the houses adjacent the proposed cell tower location. The entire project area has been leveled and graded. Given the aforementioned multiple lines of photographic and descriptive evidence, the conclusion was reached that cultural resource-bearing soils did not occur within the project area. A finding of no survey required was recommended for this project and an office review was completed for this cell tower.
Photograph of a typical shovel test over a proposed cellular tower location in Douglas County, Wisconsin. Shovel tests are dug down to a depth of culturally sterile soil and subsequently screened through ΒΌ inch hardware cloth for artifacts. Shovel tests are also systematically analyzed for soil type, which is a mixture of silt, sand and clay. Shovel tests are also matched for hue and chroma, as can be seen by the soil book to the left of the picture.
Langlade County, Wisconsin cell tower location in a boulder field.